Emails: Replying to a complaint to a travel company

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by LauraDudu LauraDudu 3 months ago.

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  • #1671
    RobertD
    RobertD
    Moderator

    Read this reply from the Customer Service Team Leader of Fly By Night Tours to a dissatisfied customer… From: t.jenkins@flybynight-tours.com To: t.w
    [See the full post at: Emails: Replying to a complaint to a travel company]

    #1912
    Alessandra
    Alessandra
    Participant

    I’m really enjoyed your article! Can you suggest me some ways of asking a refund please?

    Alessandra 😃

    #1913
    RobertD
    RobertD
    Moderator

    Hi Alessandra!

    Thanks for your question!

    OK, there are a lot of different ways that you can ask for a refund. (For people who don’t know, a refund is the money you get back from a company if you’re not happy with goods or services.)

    In the original email, where the customer complains about their holiday to a travel company, the writer used a number of expressions asking for their money back:

    “Consequently, I believe that I am entitled to an apology at the very least and also a refund for the additional costs I have incurred.”

    If you say that you are “entitled to a refund” it means that the company should give you your money back.

    “I very much hope that you will respond to my concerns quickly with a full explanation and compensation for the additional costs, as detailed in the attached Word document.”

    Here, you’ve got the expression “compensation for the additional costs”.

    In the reply from the Customer Service Team Leader, you can see the word “reimbursement”:

    “I have reviewed these and have authorised a full reimbursement for your unexpected costs.”

    If you reimburse someone it means you give them their money back.

    There are some other expressions we use in English when you want someone to give you something as a recompense or compensation:

    You can say to “make up for something” (although this is not usually for money):

    Jim bought us dinner to make up for not being at the project launch.

    If you are “out of pocket” it means you have lost money because of someone else’s actions:

    “I had to pay the electrician to fix the lights in the room we rented for the workshop. I’m now £70 out of pocket.”

    Of course, there are also lots of informal expressions that mean “to pay”:

    to stump up (informal) = to pay for something reluctantly

    to shell out (slang) = to pay

    The American English expression “to spring for something” means to pay for it:

    “Come and see me tomorrow to talk about my film proposal. I’ll spring for coffee!”

     

    Hope you find this useful, Alessandra!

    Thanks for your question. Please feel free to ask another one any time!

     

    Best wishes,
    Robert 🙂

    P.S. You could rephrase your question as follows:

    “I really enjoyed your article! Can you suggest some ways of asking for a refund please?”

    😉

     

     

     

     

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 3 weeks ago by RobertD RobertD.
    #1914
    Alessandra
    Alessandra
    Participant

    Oh wow! 🤗

    thank you so much Robert for your replay. I try to learn all these expressions.

    Alessandra ☺️

    #1915
    RobertD
    RobertD
    Moderator

    You’re welcome, Alessandra! Glad you enjoyed my reply and that you’ll learn all the phrases!

     

    Robert 🙂

     

    #1939
    LauraDudu
    LauraDudu
    Participant

    Hi Robert,

    Your link is obsolete… I really want to read it !

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